Lesson Plans

Welcome to the “Lesson Plans” section of the website. Here you will find all the teaching resources, educational videos and interactive lesson plans you will need to bring Moo Crew to life in your classroom.

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Lesson 3: Farm to Fridge

Healthy Eating is designed to help pupils understand the Department of Health’s Food Pyramid, develop an awareness of the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group and to learn to make healthy food choices. Download the lesson plan below, and don’t forget to check out our fun games and interactive worksheets in the ‘Resources’ tab.

LESSON PLAN: Infant
VIEW

OBJECTIVE

To help pupils understand where milk comes from and the process of milk production.
Duration: 30 minutes (approximately).

CIRRICULAR LINKS

WORDS OF THE DAY

Pasteurisation: Involves heating the milk to a high temperature for a short time (e.g. 72° Celsius for 15 seconds), and then cooling it really quickly.

CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

Introduction

Ask pupils the following:

  • Where do they think their milk comes from?
  • What happens to the milk between farm and fridge? (Record their responses in a timeline on a whiteboard or flipchart). What would they like to learn about the Story of Milk from farm to fridge? (Record their responses beside the timeline on the whiteboard or flipchart).
  • Display the first part of the Farm to Fridge story on the website. Explain step by step using the – Farm to Fridge Poster.

Step 1

Cows are milked twice a day. The milk is stored in a cold milk tank and is collected from the farm by tankers (that are like a giant fridge) every few days.

Step 2

Before collecting milk from the farmer, the driver will test the milk to make sure it is safe.

Step 3

When he arrives at the dairy, the driver pumps the milk out of his tanker into large container tanks to keep the milk cold. The tanker is then carefully washed inside so it is nice and clean for the next day’s collection.

Step 4

The milk is tested again at the dairy, this time by a laboratory worker.

Step 5

The milk is pasteurised to make sure there are no germs in it. Pasteurisation means heating the milk to a very high temperature for a short time, and then cooling it really quickly.

Step 6

The milk is then filled into smaller containers like cartons. After that, lorries are loaded with crates of milk for delivery. Some of it is delivered straight to schools.

Step 7

So the next time you enjoy a delicious glass of milk, you can be sure you’re drinking a high quality, natural and nutritious drink.


Activity

Farm to Fridge

Ask the pupils to pick one step in the process from Farm to Fridge and draw what happens. Then get them to write a few words or a sentence explaining what they have drawn.

Extension Activities

  1. Find out about dairy farms and dairy companies in your local area which produce milk, cheese and yogurt.
  2. Do a class project on your local dairy – visit the dairy if possible. Find out what kinds of dairy products they produce.
  3. Find out how cheese is made (Lesson Plan 4).
  4. Find out how yogurt is made.
  5. Find a simple recipe using milk or yogurt and make it with the class e.g. pancakes.

Bring It Home

How are your pupils getting involved?

See the website for suggested ways of encouraging your pupils to take home what they have learned about their local dairy and how milk is produced.

As a homework exercise, you can ask your pupils to:

  1. Look in their fridge and find out what dairy company their milk, cheese and yogurt comes from.
  2. Find out if their family knows about the local dairy.
  3. Take a note of how many litres of milk their family consumes each week.
  4. Does the milk in their fridge carry the NDC ‘Farmed in the Republic of Ireland’ Guarantee?
  5. Is their milk delivered directly to their home by a milkman or purchased in a shop?
  6. Find out if any pupils know a dairy farmer.
  7. Try making the following delicious dairy recipes (with an adult).
LESSON PLAN: Junior
VIEW

OBJECTIVE

To help pupils understand where milk comes from and the process of milk production.
Duration: 30 minutes (approximately).

CIRRICULAR LINKS

WORDS OF THE DAY

Pasteurisation: volves heating the milk to a high temperature for a short time (e.g. 72° Celsius for 15 seconds), and then cooling it really quickly.

CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

Introduction

Ask pupils the following:

  • Where do they think their milk comes from?
  • What happens to the milk between farm and fridge? (Record their responses in a timeline on a whiteboard or flipchart). What would they like to learn about the Story of Milk from farm to fridge? (Record their responses beside the timeline on the whiteboard or flipchart).
  • Display the first part of the Farm to Fridge story on the website. Explain step by step using the – Farm to Fridge Poster.

Step 1

Cows are milked twice a day. The milk is stored below 4° Celsius in a milk tank and is collected from the farm by refrigerated tankers every 2-3 days.

Step 2

Before collecting milk from the farmer, the driver will take samples to test its quality.

Step 3

When he arrives at the dairy, the driver pumps the milk out of his tanker into large, refrigerated container tanks. The tanker is then carefully washed inside so it is ready for the next day’s collection.

Step 4

The milk is tested again at the dairy, this time by a laboratory worker, for quality and purity.

Step 5

The milk is pasteurised to make sure there are no germs in it. Pasteurisation, invented by Louis Pasteur, involves heating the milk to a high temperature for a short time (e.g. 72° Celsius for 15 seconds), and then cooling it really quickly. Some milk goes a stage further and is homogenised.

Step 6

The milk is then filled into various containers. After that, lorries are loaded with crates of milk for delivery. Some of it is delivered straight to schools.

Step 7

So the next time you enjoy a delicious glass of milk, you can be sure you’re drinking a high quality, natural and nutritious drink.


Activity

Farm to Fridge

  1. Ask the pupils to pick at least one step in the process from Farm to Fridge. Ask them to draw a picture of what happens during this stage and then write a sentence explaining what they have drawn.
  2. Ask pupils to complete the Farm to Fridge Worksheet. Answers can be found on the “Farm to Fridge” poster.

Answers:

  • Each cow can give up to 28 litres of milk a day.
  • There are over 18,000 dairy farmers in the country producing 5,400 million litres of milk, enough to fill 2,160 Olympic sized swimming pools.
  • 495 million litres are consumed as liquid milk.
  • Milk, yogurt and cheese are important sources of calcium in the diet.
  • 99% of the calcium in your body is found in your bones and teeth!

Extension Activities

  1. Find out about dairy farms and dairy companies in your local area which produce milk, cheese and yogurt.
  2. Do a class project on your local dairy – visit the dairy if possible. Find out what kinds of dairy products they produce.
  3. Find out how cheese is made (Lesson Plan 4).
  4. Find out how yogurt is made.

Bring It Home

How are your pupils getting involved?

See the website for suggested ways of encouraging your pupils to take home what they have learned about their local dairy and how milk is produced.

As a homework exercise, you can ask your pupils to:

  1. Look in their fridge and find out what dairy company their milk, cheese and yogurt comes from.
  2. Find out if their family knows about the local dairy.
  3. Take a note of how many litres of milk their family consumes each week.
  4. Does the milk in their fridge carry the NDC ‘Farmed in the Republic of Ireland’ Guarantee?
  5. Is their milk delivered directly to their home by a milkman or purchased in a shop?
  6. Do they know a dairy farmer?
  7. Try making the following delicious dairy recipes (with an adult).
LESSON PLAN: Senior
VIEW

OBJECTIVE

To help pupils understand where milk comes from and the process of milk production.
Duration: 30 minutes (approximately).

CIRRICULAR LINKS

WORDS OF THE DAY

Pasteurisation: Involves heating the milk to a high temperature for a short time (e.g. 72° Celsius for 15 seconds), followed by rapid cooling.
Homogenisation: During homogenisation the cream particles are spread evenly throughout the milk so that the cream does not rise to the top.

CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

Introduction

Ask pupils the following: Where do they think milk comes from?

  • What happens to milk between farm and fridge? (Record their responses in a timeline on a whiteboard or flipchart).
  • What would they like to learn about the Story of Milk from Farm to Fridge? (Record their responses beside the timeline on the whiteboard or flipchart).

Display the first part of the Farm to Fridge interactive poster on the website. Explain step by step – Farm to Fridge Poster.

Step 1

Cows are milked twice a day. The milk is stored below 4° Celsius in a milk tank and is collected from the farm by refrigerated tankers every 2-3 days.

Step 2

Before collecting milk from the farmer, the driver will take samples to test its quality.

Step 3

When he arrives at the dairy, the driver pumps the milk out of his tanker into large, refrigerated container tanks. The tanker is then carefully washed inside so it is ready for the next day’s collection.

Step 4

The milk is tested again at the dairy, this time by a laboratory worker, for quality and purity.

Step 5

The milk is pasteurised to make sure there are no germs in it. Pasteurisation, invented by Louis Pasteur, involves heating the milk to a high temperature for a short time (72° Celsius for 15 seconds), followed by rapid cooling. Some milk goes a stage further and is homogenised. During homogenisation the cream particles are spread evenly throughout the milk so that the cream does not rise to the top.

Step 6

The milk is then filled into various containers. After that, lorries are loaded with crates of milk for delivery. Some of it is delivered straight to schools.

Step 7

So the next time you enjoy a delicious glass of milk, you can be sure you’re drinking a high quality, natural and nutritious drink.


Activity

Farm to Fridge

Ask pupils to complete the Farm to Fridge Worksheet. Answers can be found on the “Farm to Fridge” poster.

Answers:

  • Each cow can give up to 28 litres of milk a day.
  • There are over 18,000 dairy farmers in the country producing 5,400 million litres of milk, enough to fill 2,160 Olympic sized swimming pools.
  • 495 million litres are consumed as liquid milk.
  • Milk, yogurt and cheese are important sources of calcium in the diet.
  • 99% of the calcium in your body is found in your bones and teeth!

Extension Activities

  1. Find out about dairy farms and dairy companies in your local area which produce milk, cheese and yogurt.
  2. Do a class project on your local dairy – visit the dairy if possible. Find out what kinds of dairy products they produce.
  3. Find out how cheese is made (Lesson Plan 4).
  4. Find out how yogurt is made.

Bring It Home

How are your pupils getting involved?

See the website for suggested ways of encouraging your pupils to take home what they have learned about their local dairy and how milk is produced.

As a homework exercise, you can ask your pupils to:

  1. Look in their fridge and find out what dairy company their milk, cheese and yogurt comes from.
  2. Find out if their family knows about the local dairy.
  3. Take a note of how many litres of milk their family consumes each week.
  4. Does the milk in their fridge carry the NDC’ Farmed in the Republic of Ireland’ Guarantee?
  5. Is their milk delivered directly to their home by a milkman or purchased in a shop?
  6. Do they know a dairy farmer?
  7. Try making the following delicious dairy recipes (with an adult).
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