Lesson Plans

Welcome to the “Lesson Plans” section of the website. Here you will find all the teaching resources, educational videos and interactive lesson plans you will need to bring Moo Crew to life in your classroom.

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Lesson 5: From Grass to Your Glass

Welcome to Lesson Plan 5: From Grass to Your Glass, designed to help pupil’s understanding of the importance of how dairy farming and the steps involved in the milk production process. This lesson plan also includes important information about how farmers care for their cows throughout the year.

LESSON PLAN: Infants
VIEW

OBJECTIVE

To develop pupils’ awareness of the importance of dairy farming and their understanding of everyday life on a farm.

Duration: 30 minutes (approximately).

CURRICULAR LINKS

WORDS OF THE DAY

Dairy Farm: A type of farm where dairy products are produced.
Grazing: Animals, like cows, feeding on growing grass.
Milking Parlour: A building on a dairy farm which is used for milking cows.

CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

Pass the Beanbag – Ask pupils to share their prior knowledge / experience of dairy farming by passing a beanbag around the class. Pupils who have the beanbag share with the class.

Prompt Questions:

  1. What is dairy? (It is food like milk, yogurt and cheese).
  2. What is dairy farming? (It is the type of farming which gives us dairy products like milk, yogurt and cheese).
  3. What animals do you think you would see on a dairy farm? (Cows).
  4. Have you been to a dairy farm? Describe what you might see on a dairy farm. (e.g. cows, a milking parlour, milking machines, hay).

Pair Discussion

Ask pupils to think about how farmers might take care of the cows on their farm. Ask pupils to discuss their ideas with a partner and then to share with the class.

Prompts for discussion:

  • Farmers have bedding for cows to sleep on.
  • Farmers can leave cows grazing on fresh grass outdoors for around 300 days a year!
  • Farmers move cows from fi eld to fi eld so that they have enough grass to eat.
  • Farmers bring cows indoors during the cold weather in winter.
  • Farmers make sure cows have food to eat.
  • Farmers keep the cow sheds and milking parlours clean.
  • Farmers make sure that a vet visits the farm to keep the cows healthy.

Activity

Personal Activity

Begin by asking pupils as a class to think about how milk gets from a farm to a glass on the kitchen table. Then give each pupil a copy of the ‘From Grass to your Glass’ activity sheet. Ask them to look at the images for the 6 stages of milk production ‘From Grass to your Glass’ and to sequence them in the correct order from 1 to 6. Then discuss as a class, talking through each of the stages in the milk production process. *(Correct sequence outlined on page 21).

Extension Activities

  1. Ask pupils to design the cover of a milk carton.
  2. Ask pupils in groups to create their own class / school ‘From Grass to your Glass’ wall frieze.

Bring It Home

Encourage your pupils to take home the message of the importance of dairy farming.

As a homework activity, you can ask your pupils to:

  1. Look at dairy products in the fridge and identify where they were sourced from. For example, was anything sourced from a local farm?
  2. Does milk in their fridge carry the NDC ‘Farmed in the Republic of Ireland’ guarantee?
  3. Do they know a local dairy farmer?
  4. Ask them to fi nd out how many litres of milk each family member has for a week. Compare.
LESSON PLAN: Juniors
VIEW

OBJECTIVE

To develop pupils’ awareness of the importance of dairy farming and their understanding of everyday life on a farm.

Duration: 30 minutes (approximately).

CURRICULAR LINKS

WORDS OF THE DAY

Grazing: Animals, like cows, feeding on growing grass.
Pasteurisation: The heating of milk to a high temperature for a short time (e.g. 72 degrees Celsius for 15 seconds) and then cooling it really quickly.
Homogenisation: When the cream particles in milk are spread evenly throughout the milk so that the cream doesn’t rise to the top.
Milking Parlours: A building on a dairy farm which is used for milking cows.

CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

Class Discussion

Pass the Beanbag – Ask pupils to share their prior knowledge / experience of dairy farming by passing a beanbag around the class. Pupils who have the beanbag share with the class.

Prompt Questions:

  1. What is dairy? (It is food like milk, yogurt and cheese).
  2. What is dairy farming? (It is the type of farming which produces dairy products like milk, yogurt and cheese).
  3. What animals do you think you would see on a dairy farm? (Cows).
  4. Have you been to a dairy farm? Describe what you might see on a dairy farm, (e.g. cows, a milking parlour, milking machines, silage, hay).

Pair Discussion

Ask pupils to think about how farmers take care of cows on a dairy farm, discuss their ideas with a partner and share with the class.

Prompts for discussion:

  • Farmers have bedding for cows to sleep.
  • Farmers can leave cows grazing on fresh grass outdoors for around 300 days a year.
  • Farmers move cows from fi eld to fi eld so that they have enough grass to eat.
  • Farmers bring cows indoors to shelter during the cold winter months.
  • Farmers make sure cows have food like silage and maize to eat.
  • Farmers keep the cow sheds and milking parlours clean.
  • Farmers make sure that a vet visits the farm to make sure that the cows stay healthy.

Activity

Pair Activity

Begin by asking pupils as a class to think about how milk gets from a farm to a glass on the kitchen table. Note initial discussion points on the board. Then give each pupil a copy of the ‘From Grass to your Glass’ activity sheet. Ask groups to look at the 8 stages of milk production ‘From Grass to your Glass’, to discuss and then number them, sequencing in the correct order. Discuss the correct sequence as a class, talking through each of the stages in the milk production process.

Personal Activity

Ask pupils to write about how milk gets ‘From Grass to your Glass’ in their own words.

Extension Activities

  1. Ask pupils to imagine they are dairy farmers and to design their own milk carton.
  2. Ask pupils in groups to create their own class / school ‘From Grass to your Glass’ poster.

Bring It Home

Encourage your pupils to take home the message of the importance of dairy farming.

As a homework activity, you can ask your pupils to:

  1. Look at dairy products in the fridge and identify where they were sourced from. For example, was anything sourced from a local farm?
  2. Does milk in their fridge carry the NDC ‘Farmed in the Republic of Ireland’ guarantee?
  3. Do they know a local dairy farmer?
  4. Record how many litres of milk each family member has for a week. Compare.
LESSON PLAN: Seniors
VIEW

OBJECTIVE

To develop pupils’ awareness of the importance of dairy farming and their understanding of the life of a farmer and the processes involved in dairy production.

Duration: 30 minutes (approximately).

CURRICULAR LINKS

WORDS OF THE DAY

Grazing: Animals, like cows, feeding on growing grass.
Pasteurisation: The heating of milk to a high temperature for a short time (e.g. 72 degrees Celsius for 15 seconds) and then cooling it really quickly.
Homogenisation: When the cream particles in milk are spread evenly throughout the milk so that the cream doesn’t rise to the top.
Milking Parlour: A building on a dairy farm which is used for milking cows.

CLASSROOM DISCUSSION

Class Discussion

Ask pupils to discuss their prior experience, if any, of dairy farming by asking the following questions:

  1. What types of farming can you name? (e.g. tillage, livestock, mixed farming, dairy).
  2. What is dairy farming? (It is the type of farming which produces dairy products like milk, yogurt and cheese).
  3. Have you been to a dairy farm? Describe what you would typically find on a dairy farm (e.g. cows, a milking parlour, milking machines, silage, hay).
  4. Recalling Lesson 1, Dairy in my Diet, can you name any products that might be produced from a dairy farm? (e.g. milk, cheese, yogurt).

Pair Discussion

Ask pupils to think about how farmers take care of cows on a dairy farm. Ask them to discuss their ideas with a partner and for each pair to share their ideas with the class.

Prompts for discussion:

  • Farmers provide bedding for cows to sleep.
  • Due to Ireland’s climate, farmers can leave cows to enjoy grazing on fresh grass outdoors for around 300 days a year.
  • Farmers move cows from fi eld to fi eld so that they have enough grass to eat.
  • Farmers bring cows indoors to shelter during the cold winter months and make sure they have food like silage and maize to eat.
  • Farmers keep the cow sheds and milking parlours clean.
  • Farmers make sure that a vet visits the farm to make sure that the cows stay healthy.

Activity

Pair Activity

Begin with an initial class discussion by asking pupils to think about the process of producing milk in a dairy farm. Note key points on the board.

Then give each pupil a copy of the ‘From Grass to your Glass’ activity sheet. Ask them in pairs to look at the 8 stages of milk production ‘From Grass to your Glass’ and to number them, sequencing in the correct order. Discuss the correct sequence as a class, talking through each of the stages in the milk production process.

Personal Activity

Ask pupils to write the correct sequence of milk production in their copies, writing each stage in their own words.

Extension Activities

  1. Ask pupils to imagine that they are expert dairy farmers who have just employed someone to work on their farm. Ask them to write instructions for working on a dairy farm to help their new assistant.
  2. Ask pupils to imagine they are dairy farmers and to design their own milk carton.
  3. Ask pupils in groups to create their own ‘From Grass to your Glass’ poster to display around the school.

Bring It Home

Encourage your pupils to take home the message of the importance of dairy farming.

As a homework activity, you can ask your pupils to:

  1. Look at dairy products in the fridge and identify where they were sourced from. For example, was anything sourced from a local farm?
  2. Does milk in their fridge carry the NDC ‘Farmed in the Republic of Ireland’ guarantee?
  3. Do they know a local dairy farmer?
  4. Record how many litres of milk each family member has for a week. Compare.
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